Our Guide to Accommodation

Look on various Facebook groups and ask around in the neighbourhood you want to live in. Expect to pay approximately £200 a month (950,000 pesos). We recommend finding a house that is mainly, or all, Latinos so you can vastly improve your language. Some parts of the city can also be dangerous at night, so try to avoid being out alone after 9pm. Lastly, Don’t get ripped off because you’re foreign. Do some research on Colombian Facebook pages to see what the general price for rooms are. Don’t search on google for rooms, most websites are ridiculously expensive and will be mainly English speaking people.

Universal resources for accommodation in Scandinavia

Accommodation in Sweden

Lidköping

Useful Tips:

There is Airbnb available in Sweden. If you’re looking for a quiet break, then we’d recommend staying in the centre of Lidköping as there are hotels and hostels in the town. We’d recommend checking out Söne too, as it’s in the country side it might be harder to find somewhere to stay, but worth a visit! 

What our students have to say:

Copenhagen

Useful Tips:

Accommodation can be a rather difficult process. You can choose to live in halls which the Housing Foundation provide. There are a lot of options, from independent studio flats to small bedrooms with shared kitchens. The process to book a room in halls is to go the website on the day when they open bookings. You’ll be put in a queue and may only be a few options left when it’s your turn. The quality of accommodation can vary throughout the city. They may be quite expensive, and sometimes overpriced. 

Spots do open up at the housing foundation throughout the semesters. Many other international students are only in Copenhagen for one semester so you can grab their spots if you are unhappy with what you got in the first semester. There are also plenty of international student Facebook groups you can join who advertise spare rooms in flats across the city.

What our students have to say: