Our Guide to Accommodation

Watch out for agency fees and always read the contract when signing for a flat with estate agents. Definitely try and live with locals to improve your language. Expect to pay upward of €450/month with bills added in large quantities so be sure to find out this cost before committing to a contract. If you’re struggling to find a place, look for the ‘Affittasi’ (to rent) sign in the street and call the numbers.

Universal resources for accommodation in Italy

Accommodation in Milan

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Some of the best areas to build your base are Navigli and Porta Ticenese. The former is named after the canals that run through it, and the latter after the monumental city gate. These areas are perfect for night owls, as they are the home of Milan’s best nightlife…perhaps this explains why some flats here are advertised for €1500 per month. Just 15 minutes away from Milano Centrale on the S Line (the suburban train), Porto Vittoria has (slightly) more affordable rent, costing about €750 for a crib here. Looking for a flat? Try Facebook groups called ‘Stanze a Milano’ and ‘In affito a Milano’ – many young people find their flats this way, for you can talk to the landlord more directly and check out your potential housemates.

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Accommodation in Rome

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If you’re in Rome on a shorter term basis, then find yourself an Airbnb in the Trastevere area: this lively area on the other side of the River Tiber (its name means ‘beyond the river’) is full of delectable restaurants, hipster vintage shops and plenty of watering holes in between. Likewise, San Lorenzo is a student hub and is a great place for your temporary base. The key word here? Research. If you’re looking to move here permanently, rent yourself temporary accommodation whilst you contact landlords on the ground. And if you only take one piece of advice, it must be to book viewings when you arrive: do not put down money on a flat until you’ve seen it and the arrangement is confirmed, otherwise you risk losing your deposit entirely.

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Accommodation in Bologna

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As for areas, the University District is the place to be, alongside the southern part of the city where you will find most of its bars and nightlife.

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Accommodation in Trieste

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There are three main areas where the students reside here: Borgo Teresiano, Cavana and Viale. The first boasts the Canal Grande, making it the perfect spot for water babies. The second shelters beneath San Giusto, whilst the third is what one of our lovely writers describes as ‘the pedestrian artery of the city’. The best place to find accommodation is, in fact, through Facebook. Join groups such as ‘affitasi Trieste’, ‘stanze in affitto Trieste’ and ‘studenti Trieste’ before you arrive, and expect to pay between €250-300 rent for a room in a shared apartment. If social media isn’t your thing, then ‘housinganywhere.com’ is also a great place to hunt for your new home.

Accommodation in Palermo

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Looking for prime location? Of course you are. La Cala is one of Palermo’s best neighbourhoods, sitting right by the harbour and Foro d’Italico – by which a beach bar opens up during the summer – and boasting countless cafés, restaurants, galleries, independent shops, palazzi and more. For a more modern edge, try Politeama. This new side of town has cosmopolitan bars, designer boutiques and is conveniently located on the way to the beach at Mondello. Colourful and characterful Ballarò has a famous market to explore on the weekend, but it is not the ideal place to stay. It can become dangerous at night, and as a tourist, you may be at risk of running into trouble.

Hostels

Mammamia Hostel and Guesthouse on via Roma (discount available for Erasmus students) and Hostel Via Zara on via Zara. Both are very central, affordable. At Hostel Via Zara, the staff are amazing – the hostel is a converted apartment itself so the kitchen is communal and has a great family atmosphere, perfectly welcoming you to the Italian way of life. Most nights the guests cook/eat out together with the owners which is not only comforting in those first few nerve-wracking days, but also a great opportunity to share stories, practice your Italian and pick the locals’ brains for places to eat/visit.

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Accommodation in Florence

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It’s tempting to go for the first flat you see just because it’s really difficult to find somewhere to live in Florence, however it’s best to wait it out as something will eventually come up. Try using the resources above to look for a place, as well as AirBnb, Facebook pages and subito.it.

Rent can also be quite expensive around the city centre. You can expect to pay €1000/month for 2 people if you’re staying close to the centre. However you can find cheaper rentals that are a 30 minute walk away from the centre in the Romito district for around €450 with all bills included. We would recommend going to visit the accommodation before agreeing to anything. 

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Accommodation in Turin

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There is a reason why San Salvario is one of our four highlights – this isn’t only the place for eating and drinking, but also sleeping. It’s the best place to make your base. With close proximity to the city centre, Vanchiglia is also a great option, and the best way to find a flat to rent is on Facebook groups (they are constantly updated, and it’s a great way of contacting people directly). One piece of important advice: do NOT stay in La Crochetta. It may seem very close to San Salvario, but looks can be very deceiving. There is an enormous, uncrossable train track between the two neighbourhoods, which means you will have a 45 minute walk to your apericena appointment with newly made friends.

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